Our Members

Below are our valued members of ASLEC-ANZ. You’re welcome to connect with each other and continuing growing our community. To join ASLEC-ANZ please, visit our Join Us page and sign up.

Dr Tracey Benson

Dr Tracey Benson

ANU Professional Associate of Institute of Applied Ecology UC

Transdisciplinarity, cross-cultural knowledge, sustainability behaviour change, augmented reality, renewables.  Website http://www.bytetime.com Email bytetime@gmail.com

Associate Professor Ann Elias

Associate Professor Ann Elias

University of Sydney

Ann Elias’s relevant expertise lies in the history and theory of visual culture relating to relationships between human and non-human environments. Three projects (and books) on camouflage in war and nature, flowers and botany in visual culture, and representations of underwater ocean environments and coral reefs, bring art, science and popular culture to the study of human environmental impact.

Email ann.elias@sydney.edu.au

Camilie Roulière

Camilie Roulière

J. M. Coetzee Centre for Creative Practice, University of Adelaide

Spatial and Environmental Humanities, Indigenous Studies, Ethnomusicology Email camillerouliere@gmail.com

Fiona Edmonds Dobrijevich

Fiona Edmonds Dobrijevich

University Technology Sydney

Practicing artist. Research interests: Oceanic Imaginary, Human/animal relations, cultural and material understandings of the ocean. Email fiona.dobrijevich@uts.edu.au

Louise Crisp

Poet and environmental activist. Has written extensively on the Snowy River.

Libby Robin

Professor, Fenner School of Environment and Society, ANU Canberra; Centre for Historical Research, National Museum of Australia, Canberra AND Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm.

Email libby.robin@anu.edu.au

Michael Davis

Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Sociology and Social Policy, The University of Sydney

Indigenous histories and Indigenous/European encounters; environmental knowledges; environmental history, place, ecology, Indigenous rights, ethics. Email michael.davis@sydney.edu.au

Margaret Hickey

PhD candidate (Creative writing) La Trobe University, Victoria

Australian literature, rural issues, eco criticism, creative writing. Email hickeym2004@yahoo.com

Charlotte Sunde

Email chsunde@gmail.com

Freya Mathews

Email F.Mathews@latrobe.edu.au

Thomas Ford

Email thomas.ford@unimelb.edu.au

Josh Wodak

Email  j.wodak@unsw.edu.au

Dr Anne Elvey

Adjunct Research Fellow, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University

I am a researcher and poet with interests in ecological criticism, theology, biblical literature and ecopoetics. Honorary Research Associate, Trinity College Theological School & Member of the Centre for Research in Religion and Social Policy, University of Divinity Managing Editor, Plumwood Mountain: An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics. Chief Editor, Melbourne Poets Union.

Websites  https://monash.academia.edu/AnneElveyhttp://anneelvey.wordpress.com

Email Anne.Elvey@monash.edu

Dr. Thom Van Dooren

Dr. Thom Van Dooren

Associate Professor of Environmental Humanities

My research and writing focuses on some of the many philosophical, ethical, cultural and political issues that arise in the context of species extinctions and conservation. My most recent books are Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Extinction (Columbia University Press, 2014), and Making Worlds with Crows: A Multispecies Ethics (Columbia University Press, forthcoming). More information on my work is available at: www.thomvandooren.org.

Email thom.van.dooren@gmail.com

Dr Susan Ballard

Dr Susan Ballard

University of Wollongong

Su is an art historian and writer from Aotearoa New Zealand exploring the entanglement of nature and machines in contemporary art. Her thought is often infected with concerns for material objects, nonhuman foggy encounters, and wombats. Email sballard@uow.edu.au Website http://suballard.net.nz

CA Cranston

CA Cranston

She spent eighteen years as a military brat in occupied territories; migrated three times to two different countries, and lives now on an almost self-sufficient micro ‘farm’, in Tasmania, where she taught at the University for seventeen years. She is on the Advisory Board of the Indian Journal of Ecocriticism. Her qualifications are in literature (University of Tasmania), and media (University of Texas). Email  CA.Cranston@utas.edu.au Website www.ca-cranston.com

Edward Wright

Edward Wright

University of Bern, Department of English, Switzerland

I am both a visual artist and an academic researching contemporary English literature. In both disciplines, my area of interest is in ecocriticism, biosemiotics and the way manifestations of an environmental consciousness might intersect with models of human community and sociality. My paintings, in particular, ask after the connection between the social contract and environmental impact.

Email:edward.schindler-wright@ens.unibe.ch

Website: www.edwardwright.ch

Dr. Rod Giblett

Dr. Rod Giblett

School of Communication and Creative Arts, Deakin University

My interests are in the transdisciplinary environmental humanities drawing on literature, history, philosophy, theology and cultural studies. I am the author of 14 previous books, 12 of which are in eco-criticism, eco-cultural studies and the environmental humanities. My latest own-name book is Cities and Wetlands (Bloomsbury, 2016). My next own-name book is on environmental theologies in the Routledge environmental humanities series (2018). I am also writing creatively and publishing in the area, including rewriting the legend of St George and the Dragon from an environmentally and animal friendly point of view for children and adults. With Dr John Ryan, I am co-editing and contributing to two collections, one on wetlands culture in Australia and the other on the natural and cultural history of south-west forests in Western Australia. With Dr Alanna Myers, I co-convene the Melbourne environmental humanities group that meets monthly to share papers and work in progress. We welcome offers to present in the non-university and comfortable context of a pub in Melbourne. I have also completed and I am seeking a publisher for a book on the environmental and cultural history of Melbourne. I am Honorary Professor of Environmental Humanities in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University. For more information go to: https://muriuniversity.academia.edu/RodGiblett

Email rod.giblett@gmail.com

Dr. Perdita Phillips

Dr. Perdita Phillips

Independent Artist/Researcher

Perdita is a contemporary artist and researcher who has worked with termites, stygofauna, rabbits (land degradation), cane toads, salmon gum trees, thrombolites, tammar wallabies, bowerbirds, glacial moraine, urban ecosystems, albatrosses and penguins. Working across media, recurrent themes of attention to ecological processes and a commitment to a resensitisation to the physical environment, are apparent in her practice. Her current work addressing how we can be ‘both’ and ‘and’ at the same time: the role of complicity in social-ecological systems and how to maintain a contingent – yet effective – position as an artist, consumer and great ape. She is interested in transdisciplinary collaborations around anticipatory archives, geological materiality, speculative ecological thought and disaster recovery.

Email perdy@perditaphillips.com 

Website http://www.perditaphillips.com

Dr Sue Lovell

Dr Sue Lovell

School of Humanities, Languages and Social Science, Griffith University

Dr Sue Lovell teaches into Ethics, Literature and Academic Writing courses in the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences in Queensland, Australia at Griffith University. Her research interests include narrative theory, embodiment, affect and performativity in narratives specifically in the field of critical posthumanism. She is particularly interested in developing an understanding posthumanist narratives in terms of subjectivity and identity. The fields of ecocriticism and environmental humanities are becoming increasingly important to Anthropocentric identities. She has published in a range of international journals. Her supervision areas are in areas relevant to discourses of identity formation and narrative work in any form. Email s.lovell@griffith.edu.au

Ms Georgia Snowball

Federation University Ballarat

Email georgiasnowy@gmail.com

Libby Robin

Professor, Fenner School of Environment and Society, ANU Canberra; Centre for Historical Research, National Museum of Australia, Canberra AND Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm.

Email libby.robin@anu.edu.au

 

Dr. Johanna Garnett

University of New England, Armidale

Environmental peace, environmental humanities, connection to place and local epistemologies. Email jgarnet4@une.edu.au

Dr. Iris Ralph

Dr. Iris Ralph

English Department, Tamkang University, Taiwan

Email irisralph@mail.tku.edu.tw

Art Earth

Art Earth

Organisation

art.earth is a family of artists and organisations whose work is dedicated to the planet on which we live and which we all share. Find out more at artdotearth.org.

Dr Charles Dawson

Charles continues to be fascinated by human responses to rivers, and the metaphorical response to hydroelectric projects. Email chas.dawson@gmail.com

Prof. Susan Hawthorne

Prof. Susan Hawthorne

Humanities College of Arts, Society, and Education, James Cook University

I work across multiple areas of writing including poetry, fiction and non-fiction (books and academic articles). I have written extensively about ecofeminism, globalisation and biodiversity. My poetry includes work on climate change and human/animal co-existing relationships. My books and poetry have been translated into multiple languages.

Email:hawsu@spinifexpress.com.au

Christopher Orchard

Christopher Orchard

Charles Sturt University, NSW

Artist | Researcher | Bioregional Human

Practice/Research – Decolonisation and Reinhabitation – environmental mutualism – consilience thinking – critical practices of place – Yindyamarra – bioregional understanding of ‘living well’ within place – new cartographies – domestic history and contemporary practices -​ ​environmental-arts​ ​practice – arts.

Email: corchard@csu.edu.au

Dr Greg Pritchard

Dr Greg Pritchard

My 2004 PhD from Deakin was an ecocritical reading of whaling texts, of which the main feature was a Schopenhauerian reading of Moby Dick. I subsequently did my Masters at RMIT in Shadows and Performance. My writing, visual art and performance is influenced by Environmental Philosophy, Schopenhauer, and contemporary non-human philosophies.

Email: drgregpritchard@gmail.com

Dr Dominic Redfern

Dr Dominic Redfern

RMIT

I create video artworks focussed on the ways our understanding of place as informed by the relationship between social and natural histories. Over the last several years I have worked often around urban waterways where I use studies of plants, insects, microbes and human detritus to examine often overlooked elements of the environment that can tell us important things about how we are enmeshed within ecosystems. These interests are expressed with a self-conscious approach to the technology and culture of the moving image.

Email: dominic.redfern@rmit.edu.au

Dr John Stockfeld

Phenomenology of environmental valuing; environmental ethics; articulation of landscape in word and image; deep time and geological history of landscapes.

Email: jstockfeld@gmail.com

Dr Emily O'Gorman

Dr Emily O'Gorman

Macquarie University

Emily O’Gorman is an environmental historian with interdisciplinary research interests within the environmental humanities. Her is primarily concerned with contested knowledges within broader cultural framings of authority, expertise, and landscapes. Currently a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University, she holds PhD from ANU and undertook a postdoctoral candidacy at the University of Wollongong. She is the author of Flood Country: An Environmental History of the Murray-Darling Basin (2012) and co-editor of Climate, Science, and Colonization: Histories from Australia and New Zealand (2014, with James Beattie and Matthew Henry) and Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views on Environmental History (2015, with Beattie and Edward Melillo).

Email: emily.ogorman@mq.edu.au

Dr Caroline Tully

Dr Caroline Tully

Melbourne University

My research examines the archaeology of religion through the phenomenon of the numinous landscape, relationships with other-than-human-persons such as trees and stones, and transpecies communication – particularly between humans, plants, insects and birds – as depicted in ritual iconography from the Bronze Age Aegean, eastern Mediterranean and Egypt. I also have a strong interest in the history of western understandings of “Nature” and in indigenous Australian concepts of the seasons and astronomy. I am interested in thinking through societal models from the ancient world that help promote the re-enchantment of the landscape in western society, as well as aid in the envisioning of contemporary and future worlds that would be able to manifest if governments chose to see the environment as a prestigious brand for themselves and consequently sought alignment with the natural world rather than against it.

Email tullyc@unimelb.edu.au

Jamie Wang

Jamie Wang

University of Sydney, Department of Gender and Cultural Studies

I’m an PhD candidate in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney, Australia. I’m also a writer and poet. My dissertation project uses an Environmental Humanities approach to explore urban ecological development and high-tech sustainable solutions. Across my research and creative works, I am interested in looking for the agents that enact sustainable story-making and may open up some other possible futures.
Website: jamiewang.org

Email: jamie.wang@sydney.edu.au

Dr Andrew Milner

Dr Andrew Milner

School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University

Andrew Milner is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Monash University. His current research is focused on representations of extreme climate change in science fiction. In 2010 he convened an international conference at Monash around the theme of ‘Changing the Climate’ and in 2011 published its proceedings as ‘Changing the Climate: Utopia, Dystopia and Catastrophe’, co-edited with Verity Burgmann and Simon Sellars. His 2012 book ‘Locating Science Fiction’ concludes with an appeal for ‘SF that takes environmental problems as seriously as Cold War SF took the threat of nuclear war’. In 2014 he published a chapter on George Turner’s ‘The Sea and Summer’, the earliest Australian ‘cli-f’’ novel, in ‘Green Planets: Ecology and Science Fiction’, edited by Gerry Canavan and Kim Stanley Robinson; and in 2015 he co-authored an essay on ‘Ice, Fire and Flood: Science Fiction and the Anthropocene’ in an issue of ‘Thesis Eleven’ devoted to SF. He and J.R. Burgmann are currently writing a book on ‘Science Fiction and Climate Change’ for Liverpool University Press.

 

Email: andrew.milner@monash.edu

 Dr. Rick De Vos

Dr. Rick De Vos

Centre for Culture and Technology, Curtin University

I am an Adjunct Research Fellow in the Centre for Culture and Technology at Curtin University and a member of the Extinction Studies Working Group <http://extinctionstudies.org/>. My research explores notions of extinction, in particular anthropogenic species extinction, and its resonance in contemporary cultural practices. I have published essays on extinction, in particular its cultural and historical dimensions, in Knowing Animals (2007), Animal Death (2013), Extinction Studies: Stories of Time, Death and Generations (2017), The Edinburgh Companion to Animal Studies (2018) and in Animal Studies Journal (2014-2017).

Email:rgdevos031@gmail.com

Dr Robert Crocker

Dr Robert Crocker

Art Architecture and Design, University of South Australia

I teach history and theory of design and design for sustainability at the University of South Australia. My background is in the (early modern European) history of science, religion and philosophy, and my current research interests focus on the relationship between consumption, waste, sustainability and design. My most recent publication was Somebody Else’s Problem: Consumerism, Design and Sustainability (Greenleaf / Routledge 2016), and I am the co-editor of two new collections of essays, currently in press, Subverting Consumerism: Reuse in an Accelerated World (Routledge) and Unmaking Waste: Towards a Circular Economy (Emerald). I am very keen to support the environmental humanities (and its variants) in any way I can.

Email: Robert.Crocker@unisa.edu.au

Dr Susan Pyke

University of Melbourne

Susan Pyke teaches creative writing, literature and environmental studies at the University of Melbourne.

Email: smpyke@unimelb.edu.au