Our Members

Below are our valued members of ASLEC-ANZ. You’re welcome to connect with each other and continue growing our community. To join ASLEC-ANZ please, visit our Join Us page and sign up.

Please note Members email addresses are no longer available on this site.

If you are a member and would like to update your bio or photo, please email the Managing Coordinator, Alanna Myers, alanna.myers@unimelb.edu.au

 

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Prof. Michael Adams

Prof. Michael Adams

University of Wollongong

Michael Adams writes about humans and nature, and is Associate Professor of Human Geography at the University of Wollongong,. His research has examined relationships between Indigenous peoples and conservation, and recent work examines freediving and oceans. His work is published in Meanjin, Australian Book Review, The Guardian, Griffith Review and academic journals and books. His essay ‘Salt Blood’ won the 2017 Calibre Essay Prize.
Web: https://scholars.uow.edu.au/individual?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fuowvivo.uow.edu.au%2Findividual%2Fmichael_adams

Dr. Kay Are

Dr. Kay Are

University of Melbourne

I am a writer, maker and researcher, thinking through how we might re-vision the material spaces and technologies of writing practice and pedagogy through quantum mechanical precepts. I want to discover what this thinking can do to my writing, and to students’ writing, and to writing as a concept. Alongside this, I hope to learn what writing teaches science: creative writing as a mode of feminist science studies. Part of this project entails investigating models of kinetic and embodied teaching and learning through my employment in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne. Another part involves writing – conceptual, fictocritical, site-responsive and collaborative writing, and experimental translation. Some of the objects that come out of this research have been published or exhibited around the place, but others aren’t ready yet. (I like the work of making more than I do the work of being out around the place). I am now working on producing one creative and one scholarly monograph, and also a drifting-book, a sea-sponge book – an evolving, community-grown, web-based vision, still open to morphing.

Dr Keith Armstrong

Dr Keith Armstrong

Queensland University of Technology

Keith Armstrong is an experimental artist profoundly motivated by issues of social and ecological justice. His engaged, participative practices provoke audiences to comprehend, envisage and imagine collective pathways towards sustainable futures. He has specialised for over twenty years in collaborative, experimental practices with emphasis upon innovative performance forms, site-specific electronic arts, networked interactive installations, alternative interfaces, art-science collaborations and socially and ecologically engaged practices. Keith’s research asks how insights drawn from scientific and philosophical ecologies can help us to better invent and direct experimental art forms, in the understanding that art practitioners are powerful change agents, provocateurs and social catalysts. Through inventing radical research methodologies and processes he has led and created over sixty major art works and process-based projects shown extensively in Australia and overseas.

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Dr Susan Ballard

Dr Susan Ballard

University of Wollongong

Su is an art historian and writer from Aotearoa New Zealand exploring the entanglement of nature and machines in contemporary art. Her thought is often infected with concerns for material objects, nonhuman foggy encounters, and wombats. Website http://suballard.net.nz

Dr Alda Balthrop-Lewis

Dr Alda Balthrop-Lewis

Australian Catholic University

My research interests focus around religion, ethics, politics and literature – especially north american nature writing, ascetic practice, and the history of environmentalism.

Tess Barber

Tess Barber

A creative writer currently studying a Doctor of Philosophy in Creative Arts at the University of Wollongong. My current research studies alternative approaches to environment and ecology in science and speculative fictions (SF), focusing particularly on Australian SF. This research is practice-based, and includes a SF novel: Maybe revolution is too strong a word….

Kathrin Bartha

Kathrin Bartha

Monash University & Goethe-University

My PhD is about reading the Anthropocene in Australian literature, and about understanding literature through the Anthropocene debate. I work on Extinction/Regeneration, Bioethics/Technology, Pollution, and Environmental Justice and Ethics. I am also interested in trans-cultural, world literary studies and Ecocriticism.

Pie Bolton

Pie Bolton

RMIT

Pie is a contemporary installation artist working at the human/geological interface. Her practice is grounded in materiality and temporality. She uses transformation of geological processes to expand ideas about humanity as a geological force. Tertiary studies in art and science (geology) have resulted in Pie’s unique, authoritative practice. Innovative objects and installations are backed up by sound research and technical expertise to assist the development of a clearer understanding of the complex relations between the human and nonhuman. Pie has worked as a field exploration geologist, is an experienced ceramic technician and a PhD candidate at RMIT.

Kassandra Bossell

Kassandra Bossell

I am a Sydney-based multidisciplinary artist, working in sculpture and installation. A recent postgraduate of UNSW Art and Design, I completed an MFA (research) titled Humans inside Nature: Co-agency in Multi-species Art. My current research area revolves around mutualism in the fields of ecology, post-humanist philosophy, evolutionary biology and ecofeminist art. I often work collaboratively and mentor other artists, students and interested community members. For my public art projects, I collaborate with colleagues and scientists to create transdisciplinary works. I am presently developing artworks about collaborative systems, cycles and dynamics through transdisciplinary work with philosophy and science.

Dr Martin Branagan

Dr Martin Branagan

University of New England

Dr Marty Branagan has written extensively about nonviolent environmental activism in Australia and abroad, including in his 2013 book Global Warming, Militarism and Nonviolence: The Art of Active Resistance (https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9781137010094), which also explores artistic activism and the carbon bootprint of militarism. He frequently exhibits environmentally-themed art and publishes fiction, such as Horizontal Lightning (1994, by ‘Simon Ellis’), about his time with Borneo’s semi-nomadic Penan people as they blockaded logging of their rainforest homelands. His latest novel is Locked On! The Seventh and Most Illegal in the Hitchhiker’s Guide Trilogy (2018), which is based on his experiences of civil disobedience at Australia’s first blockade of a coal mine, at Leard Forest, and the successful blockade of CSG at Bentley, NSW (www.lulu.com/shop/marty-branagan/locked-on/paperback/product-23853054.html).

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Michael Chew

Michael Chew

Monash University

Michael Chew is an sustainability educator, community cultural development practitioner and photographer, with longstanding passion for environmental sustainability and global justice. He co-founded the NGOs Friends of Kolkata and Friends of Bangladesh and the Melbourne Environmental Arts Festival, and has ran participatory photography projects across Asia. Michael is completing a PhD in the use of photography for stimulating grassroots environmental action between Bangladesh and Australia. His research interests include eco-phenomenology, eco-psychology and participatory photography.

Dr Julie Collins

Dr Julie Collins

University of New England

My research interests include the role of applied theatre and storytelling in evoking empathy and transforming behaviour in environmental and social justice contexts. I am also interested in the performative aspects of Reconciliation, especially in the context of the Myall Creek annual memorial ceremony, and in recreating and decolonising Australian history in performance. I am committed to engaging in research that respects the Indigenous values of Respect, Responsibility, Relevance and Reciprocity, and which is community-based and participatory.

CA Cranston

CA Cranston

She spent eighteen years as a military brat in occupied territories; migrated three times to two different countries, and lives now on an almost self-sufficient micro ‘farm’, in Tasmania, where she taught at the University for seventeen years. She is on the Advisory Board of the Indian Journal of Ecocriticism. Her qualifications are in literature (University of Tasmania), and media (University of Texas). Website www.ca-cranston.com

Louise Crisp

Louise Crisp

Poet and environmental activist. Has written extensively on the Snowy River.

Dr Robert Crocker

Dr Robert Crocker

Art Architecture and Design, University of South Australia

I teach history and theory of design and design for sustainability at the University of South Australia. My background is in the (early modern European) history of science, religion and philosophy, and my current research interests focus on the relationship between consumption, waste, sustainability and design. My most recent publication was Somebody Else’s Problem: Consumerism, Design and Sustainability (Greenleaf / Routledge 2016), and I am the co-editor of two new collections of essays, currently in press, Subverting Consumerism: Reuse in an Accelerated World (Routledge) and Unmaking Waste: Towards a Circular Economy (Emerald). I am very keen to support the environmental humanities (and its variants) in any way I can.

 

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 Dr. Rick De Vos

Dr. Rick De Vos

Centre for Culture and Technology, Curtin University

I am an Adjunct Research Fellow in the Centre for Culture and Technology at Curtin University and a member of the Extinction Studies Working Group <http://extinctionstudies.org/>. My research explores notions of extinction, in particular anthropogenic species extinction, and its resonance in contemporary cultural practices. I have published essays on extinction, in particular its cultural and historical dimensions, in Knowing Animals (2007), Animal Death (2013), Extinction Studies: Stories of Time, Death and Generations (2017), The Edinburgh Companion to Animal Studies (2018) and in Animal Studies Journal (2014-2017).

 

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Dr Sarah Edwards

Dr Sarah Edwards

Sarah Edwards is an interdisciplinary artist based in Melbourne. Her PhD research – The Museum Hummingbird: Transforming Nature, Creating Wonder – took its inspiration from the methods used by natural history museums to prepare specimens. By appropriating these transformative processes, Sarah questioned our relationship with nature as mediated through natural history collections. Experimenting with light and sound, Sarah’s artwork examines pre-sixteenth century concepts of the world as represented through mythology, alchemy and poetry. Framed by Foucault’s seminal The Order of Things (2007), Sarah reflects on systems that ascribe meaning to the natural world.

Prof. Jane Ekstam

Prof. Jane Ekstam

Östfold University College, Halden, Norway

I work with English literature at bachelor, Master’s and PhD level. I’m currently writing two book chapters on literature and ecology as well as a young adult novel with a strong focus on climate change and the current state of the planet.

Associate Professor Ann Elias

Associate Professor Ann Elias

University of Sydney

Ann Elias’s relevant expertise lies in the history and theory of visual culture relating to relationships between human and non-human environments. Three projects (and books) on camouflage in war and nature, flowers and botany in visual culture, and representations of underwater ocean environments and coral reefs, bring art, science and popular culture to the study of human environmental impact.

 

Dr Anne Elvey

Dr Anne Elvey

Adjunct Research Fellow, Monash University

I am a researcher and poet with interests in ecological criticism, theology, biblical literature and ecopoetics. Honorary Research Associate, Trinity College Theological School & Member of the Centre for Research in Religion and Social Policy, University of Divinity Managing Editor, Plumwood Mountain: An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics. Chief Editor, Melbourne Poets Union.

Websites  https://monash.academia.edu/AnneElveyhttp://anneelvey.wordpress.com

 

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Katherine FitzHywel

Katherine FitzHywel

University of Melbourne

Katherine FitzHywel is a Creative Writing PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne. She is exploring how nonhuman animals are represented or misrepresented through the language employed in contemporary Australian poetry, and how poetic language might contribute to the perception and treatment of nonhuman animals.

David Fonteyn

David Fonteyn

I am interested in Australian Literature and environmental politics and ecocriticism. I am especially interested in multicultural writing in Australia and the relationship between multiculturalism and the environment in Australia. I have an interest in allegory and ecocriticism.

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Dr Rod Giblett

Dr Rod Giblett

Deakin University

Rod Giblett is interested in literature, culture and the built and natural environments, especially cities and wetlands. He is a writer of fiction and non-fiction, and the author of more than 25 books, beginning with the now classic Postmodern Wetlands (Edinburgh UP, 1996), the first book of wetland cultural studies. His latest book is New Lives of the Saints: Twelve Environmental Apostles (Hamilton Books, 2019). His next book to be published by Intellect Books is a cultural and environmental history of Melbourne focusing on its literature, culture and built and natural environments. He is currently writing a collection of environmental detective stories about swamp deaths. He was a local environmental activist in Perth for 25 years. He is Honorary Associate Professor of Environmental Humanities in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University. For more information about his work and publications go to: https://muriuniversity.academia.edu/RodGiblett and Amazon.com

Dr Valentina Gosetti

Dr Valentina Gosetti

University of New England

Most of my research so far has been aimed at revaluing the contribution of lesser-known poets, authors, and languages with the longer-term plan to achieve a fairer, more inclusive, and representative literary canon. My main research interests include nineteenth-century French poetry, especially by authors from the provinces of France, and the development of prose poetry. I am also interested in Comparative Literature, French-speaking women poets, and poetry translation, especially into minority languages. With Daniel Finch-Race, I am guest editing a special issue of “Dix-Neuf” on Ecoregions. I am a Senior Lecturer in French at the University of New England (Australia), following my years as a Junior Research Fellow at St Anne’s College, in the University of Oxford. My publications include the monograph ‘Aloysius Bertrand’s ‘Gaspard de la Nuit’: Beyond the Prose Poem’ (2016), the volume ‘Donne: Poeti di Francia e oltre dal Romanticismo ad ogg’i (2017), a bilingual anthology of French-speaking women poets from Romanticism to the present day, which I edited and translated with Adriano Marchetti and Andrea Bedeschi. My articles on Bertrand, provincialism, autoexoticist provincial practices, the provincial press, prose poetry appear in PMLA, The Australian Journal of French Studies, French Studies Bulletin, Romantisme (with Antonio Viselli), L’Esprit créateur (with Daniel Finch-Race), Revue Bertrand (With E.J. Kent), La Giroflée Bulletin Bertrand, and Dix-Neuf and edited volumes on multilingualism (with Paul Howard) and transnational encounters. I am now working on a book on the importance of Reclaiming Provincialism as an empowering tactic and the role of Provincial Poets in the Making of the Nation in Nineteenth-Century France.

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Prof. Susan Hawthorne

Prof. Susan Hawthorne

James Cook University, Townsville

I work across poetry, fiction and non-fiction. My books include theoretical works on ecology, Wild Politics: Feminism, Globalisation and Bio/diversity (2002) as well as works of ecopoetry Earth’s Breath (2009) and Limen (2013) and a number of titles that focus on animals Cow (2011) and Lupa and Lamb (2014). Our relationship to land, animals and plants as well as the way it affects us infuses all my work, including my fiction The Falling Woman (1992/2004) and Dark Matters (2017). I am currently working on a new non-fiction work that focuses on global violence, patriarchy, climate change and feminism.

 

Dr. Michael Hewson

Dr. Michael Hewson

Michael is an environmental geography teacher and researcher at CQUniversity, Rockhampton. His research interests are in the spatial analysis of the atmosphere using digital mapping and satellite remote sensing. But Michael works within a humanities discipline of the university and has become enamoured with the need for humanities skills to inform science and interpret the environmental issues of our day. He too then has turned his hand to photography and poetry and strategic storytelling.

 

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Karen Kennedy

Karen Kennedy

University of New England

I am an interdisciplinary researcher technically trained in political science and humanities. My current research as a PhD candidate at UNE is focussed on alternatives to the military. These alternatives are, anarchism, agroecology/permaculture and nonviolent social defence.

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Dr. Elizabeth Leane

Dr. Elizabeth Leane

I work at the University of Tasmania, and currently, hold a Future Fellowship split between the School of Humanities (English program) and the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies. My current research is focussed on human engagement with the Antarctic and the Southern Ocean regions. My most recent publication is South Pole: Nature and Culture (2016). My original training is in science, and I also have research interests in literature and science and human-animal studies.

 

Joshua Lobb

Joshua Lobb

University of Wollongong

I am a writer and researcher interested in the representation of climate change in fiction. My ‘novel in stories’ about grief and climate change, The Flight of Birds (2019) is published by Sydney University Press. I am also part of the multi-authored project, 100 Atmospheres: Studies in Scale and Wonder (Open Humanities Press, 2019), which rethinks creative practice in the Anthropocene.

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Dr Laura Jean McKay

Dr Laura Jean McKay

Massey University

Laura Jean McKay writes about humans and other animals. Her new novel, The Animals in That Country, is out with Scribe in 2020. She is also the author of Holiday in Cambodia, a short story collection that explores the electric zone where local and foreign lives meet. Holiday in Cambodia has been shortlisted for three national book awards: the 2014 NSW Premier’s Literary Award, the 2014 Queensland Literary Award and the 2015 Asher Award for books on an anti-war theme. Laura has a PhD in Creative Writing with a focus on Literary Animal Studies from The University of Melbourne and is a Lecturer in Creative Writing at Massey University.

Dr Catherine McKinnon

Dr Catherine McKinnon

University of Wollongong

Catherine McKinnon is a novelist, playwright and academic. Her most recent novel, Storyland (2017), was published by Harper Collins. She teaches creative writing and performance at the University of Wollongong. Catherine’s current research investigates climate change and narratives around atomic energies.

Kate Middleton

Kate Middleton

University of Wollongong

My research revolves around contemporary poetry, with a particular interest in ecopoetics.

Gretchen Miller

Gretchen Miller

UNSW

Hearing the voices of the natural environment, and those that move through it has been a passion for my adult life and career. I’m a radio documentary maker with 20 years experience at ABC RN in Australia, making features that explore the nexus between human, environment and the psyche. Currently in the midst of a PhD that explores podcasting and citizen storytelling as a means to communicate the unique ways we step up for our home ground. This started as a website gathering stories of ‘rescue’ (https://landcareaustralia.org.au/rescue/) and is currently (June 2019) becoming a podast of some of these short stories plus a longer documentary feature about the Atherton Tablelands in far north Queensland. The sound of the world is a critical part of my practice, and recording it has been a lifelong love affair.

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Dr Emily O'Gorman

Dr Emily O'Gorman

Macquarie University

Emily O’Gorman is an environmental historian with interdisciplinary research interests within the environmental humanities. Her is primarily concerned with contested knowledges within broader cultural framings of authority, expertise, and landscapes. Currently a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University, she holds PhD from ANU and undertook a postdoctoral candidacy at the University of Wollongong. She is the author of Flood Country: An Environmental History of the Murray-Darling Basin (2012) and co-editor of Climate, Science, and Colonization: Histories from Australia and New Zealand (2014, with James Beattie and Matthew Henry) and Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views on Environmental History (2015, with Beattie and Edward Melillo).

 

Christopher Orchard

Christopher Orchard

Charles Sturt University, NSW

Artist | Researcher | Bioregional Human

Practice/Research – Decolonisation and Reinhabitation – environmental mutualism – consilience thinking – critical practices of place – Yindyamarra – bioregional understanding of ‘living well’ within place – new cartographies – domestic history and contemporary practices -​ ​environmental-arts​ ​practice – arts.

 

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Dr. Perdita Phillips

Dr. Perdita Phillips

Independent Artist/Researcher

Perdita is a contemporary artist and researcher. Working across media, recurrent themes of attention to ecological processes and a commitment to a resensitisation to the physical environment are apparent in her practice. Her current work addresses how we can be ‘both’ and ‘and’ at the same time: the role of complicity in social-ecological systems and how to maintain a contingent – yet effective – position as an artist, consumer and great ape. She is interested in transdisciplinary collaborations around the aesthetics of care, drains and subterranean ecologies, decolonisation and Australian ecosystems, anticipatory archives, geological materiality, mining landscapes, speculative ecological thought and disaster recovery.

Alison Pouliot

Alison Pouliot

Honorary Research Fellow, Australian National University; Environmental Humanities Switzerland

I am an ecologist and environmental photographer with a particular interest in the fungal and the spineless. Other areas of research interest include environmental history, ecocriticism, Australian literature, forest ecology, conservation and other field-based research.

www.alisonpouliot.com

Dr Greg Pritchard

Dr Greg Pritchard

I am a practicing artist and arts administrator. My PhD from Deakin was an ecocritical appraisal about text on whaling, including Moby Dick (through the lens of Schopenhauer). Subsequently I did a Masters at RMIT is Shadows and Performance. My art making is writing, performance, theatre making, visual arts, conceptual arts and digital arts (VR, projection) and is often about environmental themes.

 

Dr Susan Pyke

Dr Susan Pyke

University of Melbourne

Susan Pyke teaches creative writing, literature and environmental studies at the University of Melbourne.

 

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Dr. Iris Ralph

Dr. Iris Ralph

English Department, Tamkang University, Taiwan

My interests are ecocriticism, critical animal studies, critical plant studies, and posthumanism.
Dr Dominic Redfern

Dr Dominic Redfern

RMIT

I create video artworks focussed on the ways our understanding of place is informed by the relationship between social and natural histories. Over the last several years I have worked often around urban waterways where I use studies of plants, insects, microbes and human waste to examine often overlooked elements of the environment that can tell us important things about how we are enmeshed within ecosystems. I have also recently begun work with the microscopic world of very simple lifeforms to consider the definition and nature of life. I teach in the postgraduates program at RMIT’s School of Art.

 

Libby Robin

Libby Robin

Professor, Fenner School of Environment and Society, ANU Canberra; Centre for Historical Research, National Museum of Australia, Canberra AND Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm.

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Kim Satchell

Kim Satchell

Southern Cross University

In the broad field of the environmental humanities and environmental philosophy in the Anthropocene, my key concerns are upon creative practice, everyday life studies, multi-species ethnography and place investigation. Further to these are more specific interests in oceanic studies, blue eco-poetics and ontological studies in consciousness (contemplative science) germane to the poetics (making) of vernacular ecologies as co-creative engagement with the life-world.

Dr Julie Shearer

Dr Julie Shearer

University of New England

Julie Shearer is a Theatre Studies lecturer at the University of New England in Australia. Her career began as a professional actor and theatre-maker in Australia, working with Bell Shakespeare and the QTC amongst others. After a number of years in Ireland, she completed an MA at University College Dublin and obtained her PhD from Trinity College. Her research areas include social geography, political theatre, contemporary Irish and Australian theatre, actor training and Renaissance drama. She is currently working on a book entitled Theatre in Action: A Practical Guide for Students and Teachers of Theatre, Drama and Performance.

Jill Sorensen

Jill Sorensen

Massey University College of Creative Arts Toi Rauwharangi

I am a visual artist and current PhD candidate at Massey University in Wellington NZ. I work with experiential and participatory art practices to address relationships of domestication as a site of human/nonhuman interaction. My research posits and sets out to test the veracity of a working methodology that deliberately cultivates a hopeful space for imagining and feeling, in tandem with intellectual and informational research. This is a working hypothesis in two parts; firstly, navigating a methodology through which to nurture re-imaging; through the ‘mindful fostering of a practice of durational, conceptual and intellectual holding-back from familiar ways of perceiving’. With the hope that I might open these relationships for re-negotiation on new terms, understood experientially and viscerally, as well as intellectually. Part two of the hypothesis is that an immersive art experience might hold open such a space for a viewer and encourage an attitude of observant waiting and active reimagining in relation to nonhuman entities.

 

Dr John Stockfeld

Dr John Stockfeld

Phenomenology of environmental valuing; environmental ethics; articulation of landscape in word and image; deep time and geological history of landscapes.

 

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Ms. Leanne Thompson

Ms. Leanne Thompson

Current UNSW Post Graduate

Leanna is currently undertaking a Master of Fine Art (practice-based research) sculpture, environmental, collaborative, art-science, socially engaged art practices.

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Dr. Thom Van Dooren

Dr. Thom Van Dooren

Associate Professor of Environmental Humanities

My research and writing focuses on some of the many philosophical, ethical, cultural and political issues that arise in the context of species extinctions and conservation. My most recent books are Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Extinction (Columbia University Press, 2014), and Making Worlds with Crows: A Multispecies Ethics (Columbia University Press, forthcoming). More information on my work is available at: www.thomvandooren.org.

 

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Jamie Wang

Jamie Wang

University of Sydney, Department of Gender and Cultural Studies

I’m an PhD candidate in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney, Australia. I’m also a writer and poet. My dissertation project uses an Environmental Humanities approach to explore urban ecological development and high-tech sustainable solutions. Across my research and creative works, I am interested in looking for the agents that enact sustainable story-making and may open up some other possible futures.
Website: jamiewang.org

 

Dr Deborah Wardle

Dr Deborah Wardle

University of Melbourne

Research for my writing and dissertation explores ways of giving expression to inanimate entities through climate fiction, finding in particular a narrative expression of groundwater’s vulnerability and potency.

Alana West

Alana West

University of Technology, Sydney

Phd student with the UTS Climate justice research centre. My PhD is a feminist ethnographic study of transitions to renewable energy in regional Australia. Research areas of interest include energy injustice, energy democracy, technofeminism, socialist ecofeminism and speculative feminism. I’ve been a climate and social justice activist for a decade and prior to commencing my PhD have worked for a few different NGOs and a federal Senator.

Edward Wright

Edward Wright

University of Bern, Department of English, Switzerland

I am both a visual artist and an academic researching contemporary English literature. In both disciplines, my area of interest is in ecocriticism, biosemiotics and the way manifestations of an environmental consciousness might intersect with models of human community and sociality. My paintings, in particular, ask after the connection between the social contract and environmental impact.

 

Website: www.edwardwright.ch

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