Our Members

Below are our valued members of ASLEC-ANZ. You’re welcome to connect with each other and continue growing our community. To join ASLEC-ANZ please, visit our Join Us page and sign up.

Please note Members email addresses are no longer available on this site.

If you are a member and would like to update your bio or photo, please email the Managing Coordinator, Alanna Myers, alanna.myers@unimelb.edu.au.

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Dr. Michael Adams

Dr. Michael Adams

University of Wollongong

Michael Adams writes about humans and nature, and is Honorary Principal Fellow in Human Geography at the University of Wollongong. His research has examined relationships between Indigenous peoples and conservation, and recent work examines freediving and oceans. His work is published in Meanjin, Australian Book Review, The Guardian, Griffith Review and academic journals and books. His essay ‘Salt Blood’ won the 2017 Calibre Essay Prize. Web: https://scholars.uow.edu.au/individual?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fuowvivo.uow.edu.au%2Findividual%2Fmichael_adams

Dr Keith Armstrong

Dr Keith Armstrong

Queensland University of Technology

Keith Armstrong is an experimental artist profoundly motivated by issues of social and ecological justice. His engaged, participative practices provoke audiences to comprehend, envisage and imagine collective pathways towards sustainable futures. He has specialised for over twenty two years in collaborative, experimental practices with emphasis upon innovative performance forms, site-specific electronic arts, networked interactive installations, alternative interfaces, art-science collaborations and socially and ecologically engaged practices. His research asks how insights drawn from scientific and philosophical ecologies can help us to better invent and direct experimental art forms, in the understanding that art practitioners are powerful change agents, provocateurs and social catalysts. By inventing radical research methodologies and processes he has led and created over 65 major art works and process-based projects, exhibited in Australia and overseas. www.embodiedmedia.com

Melanie Ashe

Monash University

My PhD is about how resource-extraction has shaped the Australian moving image and its surrounding industry and cultures, focusing on the region around Broken Hill. Due to the escalating global climate crisis, it is paramount to challenge how the moving image is understood in relation to our surrounding ‘natural’ environment. My project is important in that it argues that Australian film production has strong connections to the ‘natural’ environment, and interrogates how Australia’s resource-extraction economy is linked to film through practices of manufacture, representation, and other cultural industries.

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Dr Susan Ballard

Dr Susan Ballard

University of Wollongong

Susan Ballard is an art writer and Associate Professor of Art History at Victoria University of Wellington Te Herenga Waka, Aotearoa New Zealand. Her research spans the fields of art history, creative nonfiction, and the environmental humanities, and examines the histories of nature in contemporary art with a particular focus on artists from Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. She often works in collaboration with many others. Her books include Alliances in the Anthropocene: Fire, Plants and People (with Christine Eriksen), 100 Atmospheres: Studies in Scale and Wonder (with the MECO network) and Art and Nature in the Anthropocene: Planetary Aesthetics (due out in March 2021).

Pie Bolton

Pie Bolton

RMIT

Pie is a contemporary installation artist working at the human/geological interface. Her practice is grounded in materiality and temporality. She uses transformation of geological processes to expand ideas about humanity as a geological force. Tertiary studies in art and science (geology) have resulted in Pie’s unique, authoritative practice. Innovative objects and installations are backed up by sound research and technical expertise to assist the development of a clearer understanding of the complex relations between the human and nonhuman. Pie has worked as a field exploration geologist, is an experienced ceramic technician and a PhD candidate at RMIT.

Dr Chantelle Bayes

Griffith University

Chantelle Bayes is an adjunct researcher at Griffith University in Queensland. Her work focuses on urban imaginaries, posthumanism and ecocriticism with her forthcoming book Rewriting Urban Nature: Literary Imaginaries for Posthuman Cities due out in 2021 through Liverpool University Press. She has work published in Axon, TEXT, Meniscus and the M/C Journal.

Dr Alda Balthrop-Lewis

Dr Alda Balthrop-Lewis

Australian Catholic University

My research interests focus around religion, ethics, politics and literature – especially north american nature writing, ascetic practice, and the history of environmentalism.

Anne Buchanan Stuart

Griffith University

My interest lies in how things of the world intend beyond themselves and towards us, and how we find ourselves involved, often under duress, in a larger array of relations. My interest is in how things show up as entwined, often resisting any hierarchical intention, presenting in such a way as always related to something outside itself. My interest lies in how the language of ecopoetry itself makes a claim on us, and its relation to relation. My interest lies in not just what language is related to, but that there is relation in the first place.

Vanessa Berry

Vanessa Berry

University of Sydney

I’m a writer with an interest in the urban environment and memory. I’m the author of the blog and book Mirror Sydney, which investigates atmospheres, encounters, and urban and suburban experiences.

Elizabeth Burmann

Elizabeth Burmann

My artistic practice and research engages with the material encounters between nature and culture, interrogating the intersections between biology, craft, technique, and posthuman studies.

Dr Josephine Browne

Griffith University

Josephine Browne has Honours and Masters degrees (Monash) in literature, and is interested in examining and writing discourses of environment and other animals in relation to justice and posthumanism. Her PhD is in Gender Studies and includes a creative component. She is currently working on fiction and non-fiction in relation to human-animal relations and sociology.

Tess Barber

Tess Barber

A creative writer currently studying a Doctor of Philosophy in Creative Arts at the University of Wollongong. My current research studies alternative approaches to environment and ecology in science and speculative fictions (SF), focusing particularly on Australian SF. This research is practice-based, and includes a SF novel: Maybe revolution is too strong a word….

Daniela Brozek

Daniela Brozek

Bright South

An independent scholar, writer and visual artist (primarily in film, photography, poetry and cultural studies). My research interests include the fool trope, excess, the sacred and the ethics and sustainability of a commitment to place. I live in lutruwita-Tasmania, where I operate Bright South (www.brightsouth.com.au), a publisher and arts marketing consultancy. I publish Tasmanian writing, mainly poetry, and am a member of the Board of Management of TasWriters. My interests and activities are, at their core, mainly concerned with environmental sustainability, respect and the support and inclusion of diverse people.

Matt Barlow

Matt Barlow

University of Adelaide

I am a PhD Candidate in Anthropology, broadly interested in multispecies ethnography, feminist STS, discard studies, and environmental humanities. I am also a musician and arts writer with an interest in photography, poetry, and experimental arts practices.

Kathrin Bartha

Kathrin Bartha

Monash University & Goethe-University

I just completed my PhD in the Environmental Humanities at Monash and Goethe University with the title: “Unsettling the Anthropocene: Cosmological Readings of Contemporary Australian Literature” and am currently developing my Post-Doc project in the field of Intergenerational Justice at Goethe University.

Prof. Jacky Bowring

Prof. Jacky Bowring

Lincoln University

As a landscape architect I have a foot in the world of science and another in the world of art, bringing an affinity with literature, environment and culture. Originally a geographer, the landscape is a natural home, and seeing it through different lenses is a key part of what I do. Emotion and landscape is one of my main areas of exploration and I have written two books on this topic – A Field Guide to Melancholy, and Melancholy and the Landscape: Locating Sadness, Memory and Reflection in the Landscape. This year I’ve published the first ever book on criticism in my discipline: Landscape Architecture Criticism.

Dr Ally Bishop

Dr Ally Bishop

UNSW

Ally Bisshop is an Australian artist, writer and researcher living in Berlin. She draws on methods and concepts across multiple disciplines to think critically and creatively about the material, affective, ethical and relational thresholds between human and nonhuman. In 2018 Ally completed her practice-based Ph.D. in visual arts (UNSW National Institute for Experimental Arts) with an exploration of more-than-human techniques in processual artistic praxis. Previously, she studied art at UdK Berlin through Olafur Eliasson’s Institut für Räumexperimente, and microbiology (B.Sc. Hons 1) at UQ Brisbane. Since 2017 she has been an associate researcher in Tomás Saraceno’s transdisciplinary interspecies Arachnophilia project, working with the queerfeminist nonhuman figuration of the web-building spide. Since 2019, she has also collaborated with Lucy Powell in the artistic research project, Holobiosonics.
www.allybisshop.com | www.holobiosonics.com | https://unsw.academia.edu/AllyBisshop

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Dr Michael Chew

Dr Michael Chew

Dr Michael Chew is a visual action-researcher, environmental change-maker and community cultural development practitioner with degrees in Art Photography, Mathematical Physics, Humanities and Social Ecology. He co-founded the NGOs Friends of Kolkata, and Friends of Bangladesh to run international volunteer programmes and North-South solidarity work, and has run participatory photography projects across Asia. Michael has recently completed a PhD in participatory visual methods and environmental behaviour change through Design at Monash University.

Dr Robert Crocker

Dr Robert Crocker

Art Architecture and Design, University of South Australia

I teach history and theory of design and design for sustainability at the University of South Australia. My background is in the (early modern European) history of science, religion and philosophy, and my current research interests focus on the relationship between consumption, waste, sustainability and design. My most recent publication was Somebody Else’s Problem: Consumerism, Design and Sustainability (Greenleaf / Routledge 2016), and I am the co-editor of two new collections of essays, currently in press, Subverting Consumerism: Reuse in an Accelerated World (Routledge) and Unmaking Waste: Towards a Circular Economy (Emerald). I am very keen to support the environmental humanities (and its variants) in any way I can.

 

Taylor Coyne

Taylor Coyne

University of New South Wales

My interests lie in waters, the underground, and urban political ecology. My work is driven by a normative agenda to bring attention to Indigenous epistemologies and ontologies relating to water in the city. Methodologically, using sound in my research enables a deeper, more attentive focus to untangle complex socio-ecological dilemmas. Broadly, I seek to better understand the past and current impacts of stormwater infrastructure projects at the interface of surface and subsurface Sydney.

CA Cranston

CA Cranston

She spent eighteen years as a military brat in occupied territories; migrated three times to two different countries, and lives now on an almost self-sufficient micro ‘farm’, in Tasmania, where she taught at the University for seventeen years. She is on the Advisory Board of the Indian Journal of Ecocriticism. Her qualifications are in literature (University of Tasmania), and media (University of Texas). Website www.ca-cranston.com

Louise Crisp

Louise Crisp

Poet and environmental activist. Has written extensively on the Snowy River.

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 Dr. Rick De Vos

Dr. Rick De Vos

Curtin University

Rick conducts research in anthropogenic extinction, in particular its cultural and historical significance and the way that it is articulated and practiced. He is an adjunct research fellow in the Centre for Culture and Technology at Curtin University in Western Australia, and before that coordinated the Research and Graduate Studies Programs at the Centre for Aboriginal Studies at Curtin. He is a member of the Extinction Studies Working Group <http://extinctionstudies.org/>, and has published essays on extinction in Knowing Animals (2007), Animal Death (2013), Extinction Studies: Stories of Time, Death and Generations (2017), and The Edinburgh Companion to Animal Studies (2018), as well as in Animal Studies Journal (2014-2017), Cultural Studies Review (2019) and a/b: Auto/Biography Studies (2020). With Matthew Chrulew he edited a special issue of Cultural Studies Review in 2019 entitled ‘Extinction Studies: Stories of Unravelling and Reworlding’.

 

Dr Melanie Duckworth

Dr Melanie Duckworth

Østfold University College

My research encompasses the overlapping fields of Australian literature, children’s literature, and ecocritism. Within these areas, I’m particularly interested in poetry, receptions of the past (including medievalism), representations of plants and animals, and representations of motherhood, girlhood, and childhood in literature. Critical paradigms I am drawn to include critical plant studes and New Materialism.

Hélène Le Deunff

University of Sydney

Research interests: multi-species studies

Jemma Deer

Rachel Carson Center, Germany

Ecocriticism. Deconstruction. Psychoanalysis. Fungi.

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Prof. Stephanie Erev

Prof. Stephanie Erev

Portland State University

My research and teaching interests include eco-feminism, pluralism, Greek tragedy, process philosophy, vital materialism, micropolitics, and eco-art practice.

Prof. Jane Ekstam

Östfold University College, Halden, Norway

I am primarily interested in fiction and climate change. For this reason, I am writing a trilogy on climate change.

Associate Professor Ann Elias

Associate Professor Ann Elias

University of Sydney

Ann Elias’s relevant expertise lies in the history and theory of visual culture relating to relationships between human and non-human environments. Three projects (and books) on camouflage in war and nature, flowers and botany in visual culture, and representations of underwater ocean environments and coral reefs, bring art, science and popular culture to the study of human environmental impact.

 

Dr Anne Elvey

Dr Anne Elvey

Dr Anne Elvey lives on Boonwurrung Country in Seaford, Victoria. She is a researcher, poet and editor, with interests in ecological poetics, ecological feminist hermeneutics, ecological criticism and the material turn, poetry and biblical literature. Her poetry publications include, On arrivals of breath (Poetica Christi 2019), White on White (Cordite Books 2018), and Kin (FIP 2014), shortlisted in the New South Wales Premier’s Literary Awards 2015. Obligations of Voice is forthcoming from Recent Work Press in 2021. Anne is editor of hope for whole: poets speak up to Adani. Her most recent scholarly book is Reading the Magnificat in Australia: Unsettling Engagements (Sheffield Phoenix 2020). She was inaugural managing editor of Plumwood Mountain: An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics from 2013 to 2020. Anne holds honorary appointments at Monash University and University of Divinity.

Website: https://monash.academia.edu/AnneElvey; https://sunglintdrift.com/

 

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Katherine FitzHywel

Katherine FitzHywel

University of Melbourne

Katherine FitzHywel is a PhD candidate in Creative Writing at the University of Melbourne. She is exploring how nonhuman animals are represented or misrepresented through language employed in contemporary Australian poetry, and how poetic language might contribute to the perception and treatment of nonhuman animals.

Prof. Hélène Frichot

University of Melbourne

I draw on the disciplines of architecture and philosophy, increasingly locating my research between the domains of the environmental humanities and the (feminist) post-humanities. Recent publications include: Dirty Theory: Troubling Architecture (AADR 2019), Creative Ecologies: Theorizing the Practice of Architecture (Bloomsbury 2018), How to Make Yourself a Feminist Design Power Tool (2016). I am a co-editor on a number of collections, including with Catharina Gabrielsson and Helen Runting, Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies (Routledge 2017) and more recently with Naomi Stead, Writing Architectures: Ficto-Critical Approaches (Bloomsbury 2020), and with Marco Jobst, Architectural Affects After Deleuze and Guattari (Routledge 2021).

Louise Fowler-Smith

Artist, Honorary Academic & Founder of the Tree Veneration Society.

As an eco-artist Louise aims to promote new, experimental ways of perceiving the land in the 21st century. She believes that how we perceive and contemplate the land affect how we respond to the land. Her work investigates Anthropocene extinction, environmental justice and climate adaptation and rests at the intersection between the aesthetic approach to art and the ethical. For the past 20 years her practice-led research has focused on the veneration of trees, a subject she was drawn to for the magnitude of their environmental significance and their universal, pan-religious symbolic importance. She has researched the significance of ‘the Tree’ historically, culturally, symbolically, politically, scientifically and how perceptual shifts through imaging can activate change and contribute to creating new insights into environmental issues

Rachel Fetherston

Rachel Fetherston

Deakin University

Rachel is a PhD candidate in literary studies at Deakin University investigating the representation of the nonhuman in Australian ecofiction and the potential impact that such fiction has on the reader’s relationship with nature. Her research includes considerations of speculative and science fiction, crime fiction, multispecies studies, and the intersection of literary theory and nature connection. She is also a freelance writer and co-founder of Remember The Wild, a non-profit focused on engaging Australians with the natural world. Rachel is Postgraduate and ECR Representative for ASLEC-ANZ.

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Dr Rod Giblett

Dr Rod Giblett

Deakin University

Rod Giblett is interested in literature, culture and the built and natural environments, especially cities and wetlands. He is a writer of fiction and non-fiction, and the author of more than 25 books, beginning with the now classic Postmodern Wetlands (Edinburgh UP, 1996), the first book of wetland cultural studies. His latest book is New Lives of the Saints: Twelve Environmental Apostles (Hamilton Books, 2019). His next book to be published by Intellect Books is a cultural and environmental history of Melbourne focusing on its literature, culture and built and natural environments. He is currently writing a collection of environmental detective stories about swamp deaths. He was a local environmental activist in Perth for 25 years. He is Honorary Associate Professor of Environmental Humanities in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University. For more information about his work and publications go to: https://muriuniversity.academia.edu/RodGiblett and Amazon.com

Dr Adam Grener

Dr Adam Grener

Victoria University of Wellington

I am Senior Lecturer in the English Programme at Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington. My research has focused on nineteenth-century British and American literature, with a particular focus on realism and the novel. My interest in issues of scale and world-building in the realist novel has led in recent years to a more sustained focus on questions of environment and ecology in literature and art, from the nineteenth century to the present.

Robyn Gulliver

I research the history and outcomes of environmental collective action alongside other work on pro-democracy protests.

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Prof. Susan Hawthorne

Prof. Susan Hawthorne

James Cook University, Townsville

I work across poetry, fiction and non-fiction. My books include theoretical works on ecology, Wild Politics: Feminism, Globalisation and Bio/diversity (2002) as well as works of ecopoetry Earth’s Breath (2009) and Limen (2013) and a number of titles that focus on animals Cow (2011) and Lupa and Lamb (2014). Our relationship to land, animals and plants as well as the way it affects us infuses all my work, including my fiction The Falling Woman (1992/2004) and Dark Matters (2017). I am currently working on a new non-fiction work that focuses on global violence, patriarchy, climate change and feminism.

Claire Hansen

James Cook University

My research focuses on Shakespeare studies, the health humanities, ecocriticism, place-based learning and site-specific theatre. My next book will explore Shakespeare and place-based education. I created and coordinate the subject ‘Green Worlds: Environment and Literature’ at James Cook University, and am interested in using local space to enrich the teaching of literature.

Dr. Michael Hewson

Dr. Michael Hewson

Michael is an environmental geography teacher and researcher at CQUniversity, Rockhampton. His research interests are in the spatial analysis of the atmosphere using digital mapping and satellite remote sensing. But Michael works within a humanities discipline of the university and has become enamoured with the need for humanities skills to inform science and interpret the environmental issues of our day. He too then has turned his hand to photography and poetry and strategic storytelling.

Dr Alexis Harley

Dr Alexis Harley

La Trobe University

Alexis Harley lectures in the Department of Creative Arts and English at La Trobe University, Melbourne. She’s the author of Autobiologies: Charles Darwin and the Natural History of the Self (Bucknell University Press, 2014), associate editor of Life Writing, and the annotating editor of an anthology of nineteenth-century responses to the life and work of William Blake. Current work concerns how nineteenth-century aesthetics shaped the representation – or disavowal – of species extinction, ecological change, and climate change in that century. She’s also co-editing a collection of essays on bees in nineteenth-century literature and culture. Alexis is the outgoing President of ASLEC-ANZ.

Dr Jennifer Hamilton

Dr Jennifer Hamilton

University of New England

Jennifer Mae Hamilton is a feminist environmental humanities scholar with formal training in literary studies. Her first book, This Contentious Storm: An Ecocritical and Performance History of King Lear (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017) investigates the dynamic role of the storm in this iconic play. Her current research and writing continues this interest in weather, bodies, emotions and the politics of representation. Her most recent sole-authored publications are in Shakespeare Bulletin (36.3) and JASAL (18.1), and co-authoring with Astrida Neimanis, you can find work in Environmental Humanities (10.2), Feminist Review (118.1) and The Goose (17.1). She is currently a lecturer in English literary studies at the University of New England, Armidale and incoming President of ASLEC-ANZ for 2021-2022.

Kelly Lee Hickey

Kelly Lee Hickey

Kelly was raised in Darwin, on the sweat soaked wetlands of Larrakia Land, and has made her home in the dusty red country of the Arrernte nation in Mparntwe/Alice Springs since 2008. An artist, activist and creative researcher, her practice explores the intersections between people and places, through collaborative and participatory works. Her work has been published and performed in Australia, China, Finland, New Zealand, Indonesia and Germany.

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Meredith Kirton

Meredith Kirton

As a horticultural journalist my practice lies in the junction between communication and gardening. My specific interest area is in the environment and sustainability, marrying social cohesion and artistic endeavours together to tell stories.

Kate Judith

Kate Judith

University of New South Wales

I am an Environmental Humanities scholar exploring more-than-human writing practices within a semiotic material context.
Dr Nanda Jarosz

Dr Nanda Jarosz

University of Sydney

I am a multi-lingual researcher from the University of Sydney and I work in environmental aesthetics and ethics. I research the history and ongoing efficacy of intangible cultural values to environmental conservation and action on climate change. I work with literature, nature writing, and philosophy that exists at the intersection between science and culture in lived experiences of the natural world. I have written for The Conversation and The Sydney Environment Institute and am passionate about communicating my research to the broader public to consolidate a better imaginative understanding of climate change.

Dr Jo Jones

Dr Jo Jones

Curtin University

I am currently working on projects involving deep mapping, ecocriticism, phenomenology, theories of affect and river studies. My newest project involves the literary history of my local rivers and is titled “Deep mapping as post-criticism, through a case study of the literature of the Derbarl Yarrigan and Djarlgarra (the Swan and Canning Rivers of the Perth region).”

Rob Kettels

Rob Kettels

Curtin University

I am an artist and PhD candidate based in Perth, Australia. My art practice addresses specific slippages and errors – in art and the natural sciences – which continue to define the ways in which the environment is perceived in contemporary Western culture. Drawing from current continental philosophy and interdisciplinary discourse, I investigate the prevailing division between the inorganic and organic. I make sculpture, assemblage, audio-video, photography, painting and undertake durational performance in order to articulate my experience of Land. The methodology I engage involves journeys into geographically remote areas in Western Australia. By proposing an alternate point of view, my artwork aims to question the established metaphors used in the imaginary of the geologic.

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Prof. Elizabeth Leane

Prof. Elizabeth Leane

University of Tasmania

My background is in literary studies, with focus areas in place, space and literature; literature and environment; human-animal studies; travel and tourism cultures; and the relationship between literature and science (I have a BSc in Physics). I am interested in building bridges between disciplines, and particularly in bringing the insights of the humanities to the study of the Antarctic region. My publications include the monographs South Pole: Nature and Culture (Reaktion 2016), Antarctica in Fiction (Cambridge 2012) and Reading Popular Physics (Ashgate 2007), and the co-edited collections Performing Ice (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) and Anthropocene Antarctica (Routledge 2019). I am a former Australian Antarctic Arts Fellow and and currently Arts and Literature editor of The Polar Journal.

Blake Lawrence

Gadigal-based visual and performance artist with interests in the intersections of queer, multi-species, and extinction studies in the Anthropocene. Currently thinking with material practices of queer mourning with and beside bird ecology.

Giulia Lepori

Giulia Lepori

Griffith University

My doctoral research is in the field of environmental humanities, informed by material ecocriticism. I am working on my regeneration of the imaginaries of water, plants, food and waste through human and more-than-human forms of communication as experienced in two permacultural sites.

Joshua Lobb

University of Wollongong

I am a writer and researcher interested in the representation of climate change in fiction. My ‘novel in stories’ about grief and climate change, The Flight of Birds (2019) is published by Sydney University Press. I am also part of the multi-authored project, 100 Atmospheres: Studies in Scale and Wonder (Open Humanities Press, 2019), which rethinks creative practice in the Anthropocene.

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Clare Murphy

QUT

I am interested in the ways creative nonfiction in an Australian context might situate ‘the narrating self’ in the posthuman turn to develop ecocultural identities that readdress dominant cultural/colonising constructions of discursive landscapes. My research focuses on how theoretically informed and heterogeneous creative works occupy an emergent zone where experimentation with narration, transdisciplinarity, language and form might lead to new ways of conceiving “diverse imaginaries” and encourage human “situatedness” in “biosemiotic” narratives. My Masters research more specifically focuses on how creative nonfiction might use the narrative strategies of modal patterning to develop a unified ecocultural identity and voice.

Chantelle Mitchell

Chantelle is a writer and arts worker, exploring extraction and environmental philosophy. She is currently Secretary for Blindside ARI and Emerging Writers Program Coordinator for SEVENTH Gallery. Further, Chantelle is a producer for writing platform Free Association, in which she edits and coordinates experimental writing classes. Her work has appeared in Plumwood Mountain, Axon Journal, Marrickville Pause, Stilts, The Lifted Brow and others. She has delivered performance lectures for Bus Projects, the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, and the Ian Potter Museum. Chantelle is one half of the ongoing research project Ecological Gyre Theory. As part of EGT, her work has appeared in e-flux, art+Australia, On_Culture and Unlikely Journal, with other publication outcomes currently under peer review. EGT has presented their work at conferences nationally and internationally, and exhibited in Australian artist run spaces.

Dr Grace Moore

Dr Grace Moore

University of Otago

Grace Moore (ORCID: 0000-0001-5807-1475) is a senior lecturer in Victorian studies at the University of Otago, New Zealand. Grace works on many aspects of Victorian literature and culture and has published on fires, emotions and the environment, acclimatization and animal studies. She is at present writing a book about the novelist Anthony Trollope and the environment.  Prior to her arrival at Otago, Grace taught at the University of Melbourne for fourteen years and she was, most recently, a senior research fellow with the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.  She has also taught at the University of Idaho, USA and the University of Bristol, UK.
Alanna Myers

Alanna Myers

University of Melbourne / University of Canberra

Alanna teaches in the Media and Communications program at University of Melbourne and also works as a research assistant to two ARC-funded research projects at University Canberra. Her research focuses on journalism, environmental communication and settler-colonial studies, with a particular interest in place and place-making around issues of mining and development. She is Managing Coordinator of ASLEC-ANZ and previously served as Newsletter Editor and Postgraduate Representative.

Kate Middleton

University of Wollongong

My research revolves around contemporary poetry, with a particular interest in ecopoetics.

Luna Mrozik Gawler

Luna Mrozik Gawler

Mrozik Gawler is a transdisciplinary artist, researcher and facilitator interested in the role of live art in multispecies worlding and future making. Their work explores the intersections, ethics and entanglements of bodies- human and non-human, material, cultural, ecological and socio-political using speculative methodologies to consider post-human knowledge production and more than human care. This research-based practice is informed by experimental ecological methodologies and draws on more than a decade of immersive design experience to engage installation, performance, media, and text.

Dr. Leonie Ngahuia Mansbridge

Dr. Leonie Ngahuia Mansbridge

Curtin University

Dr Leonie Ngahuia Mansbridge, Ngāti Maniapoto, story-teller and multi-disciplinary Māori artist living in Fremantle Western Australia. landscape is her principal genre; she identifies to the land through her culture giving deep insight into contemporary cultural art. Abstracting the land, exaggerating the colours, is her way to engage.

Gretchen Miller

UNSW

Hearing the voices of the natural environment, and those that move through it has been a passion for my adult life and career. I’m a radio documentary maker with 20 years experience at ABC RN in Australia, making features that explore the nexus between human, environment and the psyche. Currently in the midst of a PhD that explores podcasting and citizen storytelling as a means to communicate the unique ways we step up for our home ground. This started as a website gathering stories of ‘rescue’ (https://landcareaustralia.org.au/rescue/) and is currently (June 2019) becoming a podast of some of these short stories plus a longer documentary feature about the Atherton Tablelands in far north Queensland. The sound of the world is a critical part of my practice, and recording it has been a lifelong love affair.

Dr Hamoud Mohsen

Dr Hamoud Mohsen

University of Hodeidah

Research interests: literature – poetry and ecocriticism; green studies; ecofeminism

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Dr Emily O'Gorman

Dr Emily O'Gorman

Macquarie University

Emily O’Gorman is an environmental historian with interdisciplinary research interests within the environmental humanities. Her is primarily concerned with contested knowledges within broader cultural framings of authority, expertise, and landscapes. Currently a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University, she holds PhD from ANU and undertook a postdoctoral candidacy at the University of Wollongong. She is the author of Flood Country: An Environmental History of the Murray-Darling Basin (2012) and co-editor of Climate, Science, and Colonization: Histories from Australia and New Zealand (2014, with James Beattie and Matthew Henry) and Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views on Environmental History (2015, with Beattie and Edward Melillo).

 

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Dr. Perdita Phillips

Independent Artist/Researcher

Perdita is a contemporary artist and researcher. Working across media, recurrent themes of attention to ecological processes and a commitment to a resensitisation to the physical environment are apparent in her practice. Her current work addresses how we can be ‘both’ and ‘and’ at the same time: the role of complicity in social-ecological systems and how to maintain a contingent – yet effective – position as an artist, consumer and great ape. She is interested in transdisciplinary collaborations around the aesthetics of care, drains and subterranean ecologies, decolonisation and Australian ecosystems, anticipatory archives, geological materiality, mining landscapes, speculative ecological thought and disaster recovery.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter

Deakin University

Emily Potter is a literary and cultural studies scholar with an enduring interest in the intersection of place-making and storytelling, particularly in the context of post-colonial cities and extra-urban environments. She has researched and written widely on the material effects of storytelling practices and the implication of colonial imaginaries and narratives in the generation of climate crisis. Her work is collaborative and community-based, including a recently awarded Special Research Initiative ARC project (with collaborators Brigid Magner, RMIT and Torika Bolatagici, Deakin) focused on the literary history of the Mallee region of Victoria, which works with local Mallee readers to understand the how storytelling in place informs diverse cultures of local inhabitation and connection. She is a convenor of the Swedish-Australian network of scholars and artists, The Shadow Places Network, which explores the connected impacts of colonial-capitalist cultures across these countries.

Dr Greg Pritchard

Dr Greg Pritchard

I am a practicing artist and arts administrator. My PhD from Deakin was an ecocritical appraisal about text on whaling, including Moby Dick (through the lens of Schopenhauer). Subsequently I did a Masters at RMIT is Shadows and Performance. My art making is writing, performance, theatre making, visual arts, conceptual arts and digital arts (VR, projection) and is often about environmental themes.

 

Dr Susan Pyke

Dr Susan Pyke

University of Melbourne

Susan Pyke teaches creative writing, literature and environmental studies at the University of Melbourne. She is the author of Animal Visions: Posthumanist Dream Writing (Palgrave Macmillan 2019) and the general editor of Swamphen, ASLEC-ANZ’s biennial journal. Sue is currently working on a longer piece that responds to the tiger snakes of the Stony Rises in Djargurd wurrung country and is also struggling to write some kind of memoir that does justice to her mother’s storytelling. For publication details see https://unimelb.academia.edu/SusanPyke. Sue twitters as @suehallpyke and blogs at http://suehallpyke.com.

 

Q – R

Dr. Iris Ralph

Dr. Iris Ralph

English Department, Tamkang University, Taiwan

My interests are ecocriticism, critical animal studies, critical plant studies, and posthumanism.

Libby Robin

Professor, Fenner School of Environment and Society, ANU Canberra; Centre for Historical Research, National Museum of Australia, Canberra AND Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm.

Rebecca Ream

Rebecca Ream

Tararua Ranges

I am naturalcultural geographer interested in the issues of colonisation, ‘race’ and gender as it relates to land in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Philosophically I am devoted to the work of Donna Haraway but also draw on the work of Karen Barad, Sarah Whatmore, Sara Ahmed and Helene Cixous. I also love to write academic work creatively and hence draw on a lot of fiction and poetry, Janet Frame being my most treasured author.

Prof. Kate Rigby

Prof. Kate Rigby

Bath Spa University

I have a background in German Studies and Comparative Literature, and much of my research has focussed on European Romanticism and its varied inheritances in settler-colonial cultures, especially in Australia. My work is informed by ecological feminist, ‘new materialist’, multispecies and counter-colonial perspectives. I have a particular interest in transdisciplinary disasters studies, extinction studies, and ecocritical/ecotheological studies of literature and religion.

Marlaina Read

Marlaina Read

RMIT University

I am doing a practice-led PhD at RMIT, Melbourne. My research is an eco/hydro feminist dive into emotions, interspecies contact and women’s situated knowledge in small boat fishing communities in the North Atlantic. Broadly, I create immersive and ephemeral site-specific works using sound, film, photography and textiles to explore placemaking, labour and ritual, empathy, strange ecologies and ocean imaginaries. I often collaborate with other artists and musicians. Recent works include creating ways to share space and communicate with seals and other pinnipeds, and the mythology of the woman-fish hybrid.

www.marlainaread.com

Killian Quigley

Killian Quigley

ACU

Killian Quigley is Research Fellow at ACU’s Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences in Melbourne. He earned his PhD in English at Vanderbilt, where he specialized in the relationship between natural history and the aesthetics of spectacle in eighteenth-century Britain and France. He was subsequently awarded a postdoc at the Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney. His primary works reside at the intersections of the environmental humanities, literary studies, the history and philosophy of science, and aesthetic theory. His first book manuscript, The Vast Unseen Mansions of the Deep: Submerged Poetics, 1600-1820, examines the figures of sea-going and submersion in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English poetry in relation to histories of salvage and submarine science. Another ongoing project, Waves and Places, works between narratology and geographic theory to explore literatures of sea-level rise, with a special focus on the status of oceanic—and more broadly liquid—place. Killian’s third primary research enterprise addresses shipwrecks and other sea-bottom stuff, asking how the histories drowned things tell are inflected by multispecies encrustations and other growths. At the Sydney Environment Institute, Killian was research leader for the Unsettling Ecological Poetics and Ocean Ontologies projects. He is an Associate of the Oceanic Humanities for the Global South research group. In 2019, he was Researcher in Residence with Underwater New York and Works on Water.

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Dr Kimberley Satchell

Dr Kimberley Satchell

I am an environmental and blue humanities, independent scholar working in the area of studies in creativity, oceanic studies and environmental philosophy. My current project is Auto-choreography: The Art of Living in the Anthropocene exploring creative practice, performance and spirituality.

Jill Sorensen

Jill Sorensen

Massey University

Sorensen’s research develops and examines the efficacy of embodied relational research to elicit experiential and imaginative encounters within human-nonhuman cohabitation in the urban environment. Working from a small suburban section In Tamaki Makaurau, Auckland, it re-examines the mundane interactions of suburban life as a site of a complex network of human-nonhuman interrelationship and radical entanglement. Through engaging a methodology that is in equal parts practical and imaginative, it investigates the possibility that attending to daily interactions with an attitude of respectful care and unconditional receptivity can lead to an embodied and conceptual understanding of these relationships that exceed anthropocentric norms. The research engages multi-entity interactions and agentic interplays, interweaving domestic cohabitation, immersive video installation, participatory dwelling-spaces and dialogic events, and engages with domestic space, gallery, conference and festival.

Sakshi

Sakshi

University of Cambridge

My thesis focuses on Indigenous environmental litigation in Australia, Brazil, and Canada and the legal framing of environmental justice in courts. My research areas include legal and Indigenous geographies, legal anthropology, comparative environmental law, constitutional law, and political ecology.

Elizabeth Smyth

Elizabeth Smyth

James Cook University

I am a creative writing researcher with an interest in the wet tropics of north-eastern Australia. As such, my research ventures into literary regionalism, ecocriticism, pastoralism, and other areas of study where humans engage with non-human nature or where the non-anthropocentric dominates.

Dr John Stockfeld

Dr John Stockfeld

John is an environmental philosopher and earth scientist with interdisciplinary interests centered around the phenomenology of environmental valuing and environmental ethics. His interests encompass the articulation of landscape in word and image, weaving in the role of gesture and the middle voice, deep time and the geological history of landscapes.

 

T – U – V

Jianni Tien

Jianni Tien

University of Technology Sydney

Jianni Tien’s research lies at the intersection of Digital Media, Cultural Studies and the Feminist Environmental Humanities. Her current project investigates the affective power of scuba diving in subterranean water, and how that power can be harnessed to formulate critically engaged responses to the Anthropocene. 

Simon Troon

Monash University

I am an early career researcher based in Monash University’s School of Media, Film and Journalism where I have taught since 2017 and am an associate member of the Environment and Media Research Program. My research conjoins film studies and the environmental humanities to examine how moving image media can configure different kinds of ethical encounter between humans and nonhuman forces.

Dr. Thom Van Dooren

Dr. Thom Van Dooren

Associate Professor of Environmental Humanities

My research and writing focuses on some of the many philosophical, ethical, cultural and political issues that arise in the context of species extinctions and conservation. My most recent books are Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Extinction (Columbia University Press, 2014), and Making Worlds with Crows: A Multispecies Ethics (Columbia University Press, forthcoming). More information on my work is available at: www.thomvandooren.org.

 

Dr Evelyn Tsitas

Dr Evelyn Tsitas

Evelyn Tsitas is an author with a PhD in Creative Media and an interest in all things speculative, including hybridity and the complexity of relationships between human and non human animals.

Dr Orchid Tierney

Dr Orchid Tierney

Kenyon College, USA

My research focuses on waste and waste management, atmospheric pollution, ecocriticism, and anglophone poetry and poetics.

Dr Victoria Team

Dr Victoria Team

Monash Partners

Victoria is Research Fellow at Monash Partners. She is engaging with Monash Partners health services to enhance pressure injury surveillance through more effective capture of data. Victoria trained as a medical doctor in Europe and practiced in Africa for almost 10 years. Since completing her doctorate, she has been involved in research in women’s health and, lately, in the field of wound management. She coordinates an NHMRC-funded project in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, focusing on the translation of evidence-based practice in venous leg ulcer management into general practices in Victoria. Victoria is Treasurer of ASLEC-ANZ.

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Jamie Wang

Jamie Wang

University of Sydney

Jamie’s current research is at the intersections of environmental humanities, urban imaginaries, more-than-human studies, and sustainable development in the context of planetary urbanism, climate change and environmental injustice. In particular, her research focuses on some of the many cultural, political, ethical and philosophical issues that arise in the pursuit of an ecological modernised urban future.

 

Dr Linda Williams

Dr Linda Williams

RMIT University

A cultural historian with a background in social & critical theory, Williams works in the environmental humanities and studies in human-animal relations with a focus on how histories of the longue durée continue to shape responses to the present day crises of climate change and species extinction. Her research in cultural and environmental history investigates the status of the nonhuman world in western art & thought, particularly in European ideas of nature from 17th century early modernity. This focus includes the question of how the arts, science and processes of globalisation have shaped the affective & material practices of everyday life . Williams leads the AEGIS research network for the arts and ecology and is a former President of ASLEC-ANZ.

Kirsty Workman

Kirsty Workman

University of Queensland

I’m currently working my way (slowly) through the Master of Communication, Social Change at UQ, whilst also juggling full time work as the QLD & Northern NSW Account Manager for NewSouth Books. I’m hoping to one day, in the not-too-distant future, study a PhD in environmental literature and/or communication. I’d love to explore the different ways in which environmental issues are portrayed through different kinds of literature and the impact this has on perceptions of environmental issues in society, particularly in relation to complex environmental issues such as climate change.

Dr Tom Wilson

Dr Tom Wilson

University of Western Australia

I have written an ecocritical study of the works of John Fowles, and an environmental history and landscape memory of Western Australia. My current research interest is a cultural history of the concept of rewilding ourselves, starting about five centuries ago in Western Europe. I’m also interested in classical Chinese landscape poetry.

Dr Deborah Wardle

Dr Deborah Wardle

RMIT University

My research crosses the disciplines of creative writing and hydrogeology. Storying the voices of groundwater merges literatures and sciences through narrative.

Jaxon Waterhouse

I am a writer and researcher living in NW part of WA. One half of Heart of Hearts, a small press dedicated to artist publications and exhibition catalogues. I am also one half of an ongoing research project, Ecological Gyre Theory, which has seen work published in e-flux, art+Australia, On_Culture and Unlikely Journal, with other publication outcomes currently under peer review. EGT has presented their work at conferences nationally and internationally, and exhibited in Australian artist run spaces.

Dr Jessica White

Dr Jessica White

Jessica White is the author of the novels A Curious Intimacy (2007) and Entitlement (2012) and a hybrid memoir, Hearing Maud (2019). Her essays, short stories and poems have appeared widely in Australian and international literary journals and have been shortlisted or longlisted for prizes. Jessica is also the recipient of funding from Arts Queensland and the Australia Council for the Arts and has undertaken residencies in Tasmania and Rome. She is currently based at The University of Queensland where she is writing an ecobiography of Western Australia’s first female scientist, 19th century botanist Georgiana Molloy. Jessica is the Newsletter Editor for ASLEC-ANZ.

X – Y – Z

Tessa Zettel

Tessa Zettel

The T. Rudzinskaitė Memorial Amateur Lichenologists Society

The T. Rudzinskaitė Memorial Amateur Lichenologists Society is dedicated to the love and study of lichen in this galaxy and beyond. www.welikelichen.space